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Ye Diwali family wali

Celebrate Diwali with your family and make happy memories that will last a lifetime.

 

My favorite Diwali memory is spending a lovely day with my family at my grandparents’ house. That was over a quarter-century ago. Things have evolved through time, and it’s becoming increasingly difficult to get together during Diwali. At the very least, I have beautiful recollections of Diwali festivities from my youth, and that motivates me. If you relate to my experience, you’ll understand why it’s critical to provide your child with positive memories of holidays with family and friends.

Cities have joined together as a family to celebrate the victory of good over evil on this auspicious day throughout history.

  • Lord Rama defeated Ravana, the wicked king.
  • Lord Krishna killed the monster Narakasura, and the people of Ayodhya lit clay diyas and exploded crackers to commemorate Ravana’s death and Rama’s homecoming after a 14-year exile. Balvikas teacher and storyteller Amrutha Venkataramani states, “The wicked rakshasa Narakasura was the son of the Goddess of the Earth. Narakasura recognized his error when he was ready to die. As a result, he desired that his death be commemorated.”

It’s all about the family on Diwali.

Families who celebrate together are more likely to stay together. Families need to gather on a festive occasion such as Diwali because it: • Gives a family an identity because each family has its customs.

  • Allows plenty of love, happiness, laughter, humor, fun, excitement, reverence, and sharing.
  • Demonstrates that the most significant way to celebrate is with family and friends.
  • Brings family members closer together through play and sharing.
  • Assists in the re-establishment of family relationships.
  • Provides a chance to welcome new family members into the fold.
  • Allows grandparents to pass on family traditions, tell tales, and explain the family’s cultural and religious beliefs and customs.
  • Assists seniors in passing down family heirlooms, artifacts, and heirlooms to younger generations, allowing children to trace their family tree and roots.
  • Assists in the development of communal life. Your child’s social life will be aided by visits to relatives’ houses, as well as meetings with neighbors and acquaintances.

Happy memories become positive inner resources that help relax the mind because they cause the brain to generate feel-good neurotransmitters. Making pleasant memories encourages your youngster to recall the good moments above the negative. They encourage your youngster to see the world in a positive light. They also broaden his horizons by exposing him to new options and experiences, boosting his inventiveness, and allowing him to be more helpful.

During Diwali, we get together with our extended family. Early in the morning, we take an oil bath, followed by a wonderful meal prepared by the elders. The family’s eldest performs Lakshmi pooja in the evening while the rest of us sit and pray. When I don’t comprehend what’s happening during the pooja, my relatives make jokes or pull my leg. We light diyas and break crackers afterward. For me, Diwali is a special occasion. Every year, I look forward to it.

The best times are spent with family. We agree that arranging or attending a family reunion may be exhausting, especially in today’s environment. However, a little effort may go a long way toward generating lifelong memories. Together, carry on your family’s traditions: Following customs becomes more fun when everyone gets together. It’s pretty OK if you can’t spend Diwali with your extended family. Bring together your first family.

Even if you’re only creating one type of treatment for Diwali, make it with your child instead of buying it. You may explain to her what Diwali is and why it is celebrated while you’re creating sweets. As a result, this is excellent storytelling and bonding opportunity for you and your child. Engage younger children in creative activities such as making a rangoli outside. It does not need to be flawless, but it must be significant. Involve your youngster in the process of putting up puja when you’re performing it at home. This is a more inclusive approach. Give your youngster little chores to accomplish and praise him when he finishes them.

Traditional traditions aid in the initiation of talks and debates. Your youngster will start to communicate his feelings and thoughts. As a result, there are more constructive arguments and negotiations. When your youngster asks you a question, remember to be patient.

We must join together as a family to celebrate Diwali, just like the inhabitants of a kingdom did. Rather than fretting about the planning and preparation, enjoy the event. The festival of Diwali is all about making joyful and beautiful memories. So go ahead and provide your youngster with a lifetime of beautiful memories!

 

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