Ramayana

The Ramayana is an ancient Indian epic, composed some time in the 5th  century BCE, about the exile and then return of Rama, prince of Ayodhya. It was composed in Sanskrit by the sage Valmiki, who taught it to Rama’s sons, the twins Lava and Kush. At about 24000 verses, it is a rather long poem and, by tradition,  is known as the Adi Kavya (adi = original, first; kavya = poem). While the basic story is about palace politics and battles with demon tribes, the narrative is interspersed with philosophy, ethics, and notes on duty. While in that other Indian epic, the Mahabharata, the characters are presented with all their human follies and failings, the Ramayana leans more towards an ideal state of things: Rama is the ideal son and king, Sita the ideal wife, Hanuman the ideal devotee, Lakshman and  Bharat the ideal brothers, and even Ravana, the demon villain, is not entirely despicable. 

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Ramayana Chapters

Famous Shloka from Ramayana

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The saying “If one continues to live, happiness and bliss may come even after a gap of a hundred years” seems to me an auspicious one. [Context: Sita’s words to Hanuman from whom she hears news of Rama and Lakshmana and their efforts to kill Ravana and the Rakshasas and release her from captivity. She had earlier contemplated suicide but now she realizes that living was a good thing because happiness will not elude one for ever.]...!!
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To be under the control of another is to be condemned; it is the worst thing that can befall a person. Love and affection is possible only when a person is being seen and is not out of sight in a far away place. [Context: Soliloquies of Sita who is being threatened by the Rakshasis guarding her to accept the advances of Ravana which Sita totally refuses to do.]
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A Veena cannot exist without its strings. A chariot cannot exist without its wheels. Without her husband a woman can never live happily even though she has a hundred sons. [Context: Sita’s response to Kausalya’s advice asking her to respect and obey Rama in spite of his being deprived of the kingdom. ]

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