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Dhanteras is a Hindu festival that takes place two days before Diwali throughout the country. Dhanteras, also known as Dhantrayodashi, is a significant Hindu festival that marks the start of Diwali. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Kuber are worshipped for good luck and wealth on this auspicious day. One is nearing the cleansing house of dirt and negative energy, the diyas have been acquired, and the marketplaces are brimming with Lakshmi and Ganesha idols looking for a new home. In short, you’re ready for Diwali, the five-day holiday that begins with Dhanteras tomorrow. Dhanteras, which is made up of the Sanskrit words dhan, which means riches, and teras, which refers to the 13th day of the Hindu calendar, is celebrated by praying to goddess Lakshmi and buying metal things.

Gold and gold jewelry are an essential part of Indian culture. Gold is seen as a sign of good fortune, plenty, and auspiciousness. Gold is considered as the symbol of Goddess Lakshmi, the goddess of riches. Those who celebrate Diwali buy jewelry, gold or silver coins, or home products made of iron, copper, or brass, depending on their means. Some even purchase modest utensils, but the primary focus is on purchasing anything made of metal. The reasoning behind purchasing something made of metal is that it is said to be a harbinger of good fortune and is said to keep bad energy at bay. The genesis of this idea is supposed to be based on a narrative in which the God of Death, Yama, was tempted by the sight of wealth.

MYTHOLOGY

According to legend, a monarch named Hima had a son who was destined to die on the fourth day of his marriage. On the other hand, Hima’s daughter-in-law rescued him from death by stopping Yamaraj, the god of death, from entering the entrance. She did so by adorning the door with diyas, gold jewelry, and silver money. Yamaraj, who had disguised himself as a serpent, was dazzled by the intense light from the gleaming jewelry and the dazzling diyas. As a result, Hima’s son’s life was spared. As a result, the tradition of buying gold and silver began during Dhanteras. So, don’t forget to welcome Lady Luck into your home by purchasing metal and lighting plenty of diyas to ward off any evil spirits lurking in the shadows.

 TIMINGS

Dhanteras, also known as Dhantrayodashi, is the first day of Diwali celebrations. Dhan is a Hindi word that means “wealth.” In the Hindu month of Kartik, it falls on the thirteenth lunar day of Krishna Paksha. On this day, people worship Goddess Lakshmi and Lord Kubera. According to the Drik Panchang, Goddess Lakshmi emerged from the ocean during the churning of the Milky Sea, which is known as Samudra Manthan, on the day of Dhanteras. Dhanteras is considered a lucky time to buy clothing, jewelry, kitchenware, and electronics. Buying gold and silver on Dhanteras is also said to bring more money and success.

People also worship Lord Dhanvantri, the Ayurvedic God, on Dhanteras Day. Lord Dhanvantari is said to have taught the wisdom of Ayurveda for the improvement of mankind and the relief of illness suffering. People burn diyas (earthen lights) at their houses in the evening on Dhanteras. They also adorn their homes and gather to perform Laxmi Puja as a group. They also present flowers and sweets to Goddess Lakshmi, Lord Kubera, Lord Dhanvantri, and light incense sticks.

According to a report by Drik Panchang, some individuals burn a lamp outside their home for the Yama God to ward off any early deaths in their families. Pradosh Kaal is the time to do Lakshmi Puja on Dhanteras. On Dhateras, the Pradosh Kaal begins after dusk and lasts roughly 2 hours and 24 minutes.

The narrative of how the prince was rescued from death gave rise to the custom of buying gold on Dhanteras Day. On this day, gold is stored in puja, and a lamp called as Yama Deep is lighted in front of the main door to request Lord Yama’s and goddess Lakshmi’s blessings.

Happy Dhanteras!

Written by Seemaa Eathirajan

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